House and Acreage Restoration, Yardwork

Into the Woods (Part II)

Alright, are you ready for the crazy cool stuff? (I get so overly excited about this kind of thing, I’m sure a nut about finding old stuff!)

Let me explain some backstory, and then we’ll get right to the photos. Our property use to be right next to a railroad track. The tracks don’t exist anymore. But, from what we’ve been told, the tracks would bring livestock to the property to be auctioned. The people who lived here, at one time, kept livestock and farmed. We know a young family lived here in the early 1900s when the house was built. My guess is that the family had a decent amount of money, based on the wallpaper and luxuries (shoes, magazines, etc) that were found in the walls.

At some point, they gave up on using some older technology and threw out items (into the grove of trees). The house eventually came to be owned by a man who *thought* he could do a remodel on the house. He basically screwed the house up mercilessly, but he also just didn’t clean up a lot of things most people would have. By drywalling over the lathe and plaster walls, etc, he created this time capsule so we could see the original style of the house and find the interesting artifacts in the walls. By siding the house over the original siding, we knew what the house actually looked like when first built. By not fixing any structural problems and just adding his own “fixes” instead of solving the problem, we came to understand a lot of the appearance of our home.

He also didn’t clean out the grove of trees. EVER. And so, we have been left with a rusting relic of what the past was like in mechanical terms for the little farm. So, here is the rest of the journey into the woods, in pictures:

Perhaps not the most interesting, but I had a teacher in high school who collected barbed wire. There is lots of barbed wire out there.
Perhaps not the most interesting, but I had a teacher in high school who collected barbed wire. There is lots of barbed wire out there.
Close up of the barbed wire for you Lubbock.
Close up of the barbed wire for you Lubbock.
Two trees growing out of a barrel.
Two trees growing out of a barrel.
IMG_2372
Corn sheller (separates the kernels from the ear). Now this is done by a combine.
IMG_2379
Disc-turns the soil. It’s a tilling tool and they are still used today.

 

Auger-moves grain. It's like a conveyer belt in a tube. (That's what Tyler said).
Auger-moves grain. It’s like a conveyer belt in a tube. (That’s what Tyler said).
IMG_2366
Tractor mounted cultivator-loosens the soil between the planted rows to keep weeds and grass out of the rows of crops (this was before spraying, etc). Now, Tyler doesn’t know if people cultivate anymore.

At this time in the blog post, the remaining pictures include one where I don’t know what the item is.  Since Tyler is replacing the glass in a window purchased for the garage (it was $40 if we replaced the glass ourselves-which is SUCH a deal!), he is getting a little irritated about me asking questions about the stuff in the grove and what it does. So….my intelligent engineering mind obviously will have great guesses.

[UPDATE: He has time to answer the questions now]

Praying Mantis.
Two-bottom plow. Plow turns the soil over and makes if borough. It would be towed behind a tractor.
My favorite thing EVER! This is the chassis to either a Model A or a Model T. We obviously don't know.
My favorite thing EVER! This is the chassis to either a Model A or a Model T. We obviously don’t know.
Look at how that wood is sculpted on the rims! And it has survived a long time!
Look at how that wood is sculpted on the rims! And it has survived a long time!

And to end the post, here’s a little Mr. Pedersen history lesson:

When the settlers came to the prairie, they came with wooden equipment. The same type of equipment that was used out east and in the south to farm. However, the plains states has amazing tough grasslands. The shaft of the grass was as thick as a penny. The roots were so strong, that the wooden equipment wasn’t strong enough to break through and cultivate the soil.

So this gentlemen, you might have heard of him, named John Deere started making steel plows. And with the railroads and the steel tycoons of the end of the end of the 18th century started to make this possible. Although Mr. Deere is known for tractors, his real start was using steel to make farm equipment that people on the prairie could use agriculturally.

And your freedom does NOT allow you to infringe upon the freedoms of others.

End of lesson.

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